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Offline Raginghulk

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What do I need for a Euro tour?
« on: August 11, 2019, 07:33:17 AM »
Hi all!

Im doing a trip to Italy in September to misano for the Moro gp with my mate.

Getting ferry to Amsterdam then riding there and back!

We will be camping along the way so accommodations sorted, but keen to know what I need for the trip.

Someone said bike needs a GB sticker, and need passes for motorways?

All advice and experience shared welcome!

Thanks

If your not smiling after a ride, go and do it again till you are!!
😃😃😃

Offline gojonnygo

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Re: What do I need for a Euro tour?
« Reply #1 on: August 11, 2019, 10:53:18 AM »
I've got a list somewhere will try to find it later but important things;
GB sticker.
Check your insurance is fully comp abroad, lot of policies automatically drop to 3rd part only when out of the UK.
Bike recovery/breakdown insurance.
Driving licence.
Holiday insurance which includes riding large bikes, lots only cover up to 125cc.
All original documents, if you are unlucky to get stopped photo copies or electronic copies are no good.
European Health Insurance Card.
Maps in case sat nav packs up.
Spare key. List of emergency contacts.
When we go abroad we swap emergency details just in case.
Puncture repair kit, gaffer tape, cable ties, bike handbook.
Compulsory depending on which country; high viz jacket/vest, first aid kit, spare bulbs & fuses, breathalizers.
If you are going through any large towns/cities check to see if you need Low Emission Zone Badges/Vignettes.
Looks a lot but toured Europe many times and best to be safe than sorry.
Extra tip; we always stop for petrol on our own side of the road. It is so easy to ride out of a petrol station on the other side of the road and stay on the left.
Have a great time.

Offline Raginghulk

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Re: What do I need for a Euro tour?
« Reply #2 on: August 11, 2019, 11:07:07 AM »
Cheers for that list mate :031:
If your not smiling after a ride, go and do it again till you are!!
😃😃😃

Offline Rockape737

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Re: What do I need for a Euro tour?
« Reply #3 on: August 11, 2019, 06:51:44 PM »
*Originally Posted by gojonnygo [+]
I've got a list somewhere will try to find it later but important things;
GB sticker.
Check your insurance is fully comp abroad, lot of policies automatically drop to 3rd part only when out of the UK.
Bike recovery/breakdown insurance.
Driving licence.
Holiday insurance which includes riding large bikes, lots only cover up to 125cc.
All original documents, if you are unlucky to get stopped photo copies or electronic copies are no good.
European Health Insurance Card.
Maps in case sat nav packs up.
Spare key. List of emergency contacts.
When we go abroad we swap emergency details just in case.
Puncture repair kit, gaffer tape, cable ties, bike handbook.
Compulsory depending on which country; high viz jacket/vest, first aid kit, spare bulbs & fuses, breathalizers.
If you are going through any large towns/cities check to see if you need Low Emission Zone Badges/Vignettes.
Looks a lot but toured Europe many times and best to be safe than sorry.
Extra tip; we always stop for petrol on our own side of the road. It is so easy to ride out of a petrol station on the other side of the road and stay on the left.
Have a great time.
:460: :028: off to Assen in September, going with friend who’s rode through Europe a few times. I’ve driven but never ridden in mainland Europe, I have ridden elsewhere.

Offline kernowjim1

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Re: What do I need for a Euro tour?
« Reply #4 on: August 12, 2019, 01:12:17 PM »
*Originally Posted by Raginghulk [+]
Hi all!

Im doing a trip to Italy in September to misano for the Moro gp with my mate.

Getting ferry to Amsterdam then riding there and back!

We will be camping along the way so accommodations sorted, but keen to know what I need for the trip.

Someone said bike needs a GB sticker, and need passes for motorways?

All advice and experience shared welcome!

Thanks

Dream trip! 

Offline Himself

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Re: What do I need for a Euro tour?
« Reply #5 on: August 13, 2019, 07:27:02 AM »
My 2pence worth ...  :002:

Some of the stuff you may want to consider is because the local laws say you need them. For example, you need to carry a first aid kit in a lot of Europe, but I've never seen a definition as to what should be in one. Not a bad thing to carry one anyway. Amazon has them for a few pounds. Same with a spare bulb kit. I even carry H7 headlight bulbs for my SX - as much use as a chocolate teapot in reality, but I have them to comply with the rules.

https://www.amazon.co.uk/gp/product/B00GOL9ZW8/ref=ppx_yo_dt_b_asin_title_o02_s00?ie=UTF8&psc=1

Warning triangle. Amazon again. A small one. I'm sure there is a definition somewhere of the exact dimensions and mine may not comply, but I have one with me.

https://www.amazon.co.uk/gp/product/B07FLGG4M6/ref=ppx_yo_dt_b_asin_title_o02_s01?ie=UTF8&psc=1

Hi-Viz ... I have dayglow panels on my jacket, but I also have one of the excellent Oxford over jackets. If that isn't hi-viz enough ... I'm lost  :008:

https://www.sportsbikeshop.co.uk/motorcycle_parts/content_prod/244260

Tools - Cheap multiman tool. It might be a one-shot wonder for 15 quid but you only need it to get you out of trouble. Duct tape fixes everything but stupid. It can even fix a leak on your clothing. Puncture repair kit and know how to use it. Cable ties. No need to double up on everything, share the list with your mates. You only need one breaker bar between you for example. Fuses ... Often forgotten. Visor cleaner and a microfibre cloth.

Documents ... Original copies of the V5 and Insurance. Take photos of these with your phone just in case you lose the originals. Same for your passport. So much easier when you can show a photo and explain the original was lost or stolen.

As others have said, a complete set of spare keys and swap them with your mates.

GPS and speed cameras. France does not allow speed camera warnings. I could not comment on having the excellent SAMCAM application running on your phone in your jacket - honest you were listening to music. Caution mobile data charges in some countries.

Inferred speed limits. When you pass a sign with the village/town name on it, it often marks the start of the town speed limit. 70kph at best, most likely 50kph. When you pass the same sign, this time with a line through it, as you leave the town/village, that marks the end of the reduced speed limit. Don't take this as an absolute, there is always going to be somewhere this doesn't apply. There often isn't a large 30mph (50k) sign as we have.

Policemen ... Doesn't matter what country you are in there is always "that" policeman, and if you get him (or her) then it is going to hurt. The sarcasm and rhetorical questions are disrespectful enough in English - something in the training about establishing dominance in the conversation - luckily I don't speak french and so have never understood them.

To that point ... don't have a wallet stuffed with all your cash. It is in the minority, but there have been cases of the fine matching the amount of money available. I'm not suggesting corruption, just if you have 200 euros the fine is 200 euros. If you only have 50 ... you get the idea.

French motorways are excellent for getting high miles done, but cost a small fortune in tolls. I've never found the motorcycle lane that a few people speak of, but then again I prefer the non-motorway routes. About 8-12ks before a toll booth you will often pass under a gantry. If fact any gantry across a motorway will often include a speed camera.

If you do get done the bill arrives in the post a few weeks later. They reduce the speed the camera caught you at to allow for any inaccuracies and then issue the fine. It is only a fine. No points go on your license. There is a discount for paying promptly, which you do via their website. All very efficient.  :023:

Turning across double white lines. In the UK we turn right across double white lines. Not so the case in Spain (don't know about the rest of Europe). Often there is a blue square sign with what looks like a figure 4 in it. This is telling you to go to the next junction to and double back. Most of the time this is a roundabout or a slip road that takes you under or over the main road. I've seen policeman sitting in the cafe just waiting to "raise public awareness of the issue".

If you are avoiding France and going the Holland - Germany - Switzerland route to Italy, then check the need for Vinettes - These are stickers you buy at the local shops. Like road tax. You can get them for weeks or months as well as a year. Why we don't have them for overseas visitors ... oh well.

Filtering laws differ from the UK. On Germany autobahns, there is a rule that when they stop car drivers are required to pull to either edge of the road to make space for emergency vehicles. This is such a tempting lane to filter down, but the German police can take a very dim view of it. It is OK to filter if itis road works, just not accidents. How you work out the difference from 5 kilometres back remains a mystery. Often there will be information on the motorway signs telling you about roadworks. If you didn't see it and the traffic slows, proceed with caution or not at all.

Right, I've waffled on for long enough. It sounds like a lot but it isn't difficult. The roads are in better condition than most of ours. The coffee stops are excellent. Sounds like an excellent trip ... Enjoy
« Last Edit: August 13, 2019, 07:37:33 AM by Himself »

Offline Streak198507

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Re: What do I need for a Euro tour?
« Reply #6 on: August 25, 2019, 09:32:59 AM »
plenty of good advice above, I've just landed back from 2 weeks in Spain and Portugal

I always take a spare set of levers ( brake and clutch ) a minor drop ( nearly dropped mine when it fully loaded #heavyas###k ) breaking your clutch lever will leave you in trouble, unlikely to happen but having a spare lever means if it did id be on the road again in 15 mins

I know people who don't take them and people who do, its all personal preference

 


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